Feedback | I was a judge in the Stop and Frisk case. I don’t think Bloomberg is racist.

Feedback | I was a judge in the Stop and Frisk case. I don't think Bloomberg is racist.

In 2013, I ruled Floyd vs. City of New York That the tactics underlying the city’s Stop and Frisk program violate the constitutional rights of people of color. During the Bloomberg Mayor of New York, the people of Krishna and Latino were inadvertently shut down and snowed several times a million times, reaching 909,000 in 20 years. After giving my verdict, The number of stops has dropped to 11,000 in 2018 And The offense did not increase.

Nevertheless, Mayor Bloomberg continued to defend by encouraging Stop and Frisk with comments that raised eyebrows at the Aspen Institute in 2015, which recently re-emerged. He apologized for the policy just days before jumping into office after being sworn in as president. Many people think he is a racist? I don’t think so. If he does not see the more valuable work he has done for the minorities. I do not believe he understood the human harm of stopping black and Latino men, 90 percent of which did not result in summons or arrest. The stops, however, were intimidating, abusive, and uncontrollable attacks of black and brown people.

During the Floyd trial, and even today, I am convinced that Mayor Bloomberg believed that the Stop and Frisk policy – which began under his immediate predecessor, Rudy Giuliani, but increased dramatically during Mr. Bloomberg’s tenure – was protecting African Americans, who were unnecessarily victimized by crime. While this has been widely denied, he believed in the principle of “broken windows” policing, where small violations could prevent the rise of crime. He believes his police commissioner, Ray Kelly, Who told him that young black men would drop a gun at home if they stopped thinking. It was misleading because a stop based on racist profiles rather than rational suspicion is unconstitutional. However, that does not mean that he hates black people. Most of all I can say he had a pure heart but an empty head; The Stop and Frisk program was very poorly executed.

It’s easy to write in simple terms about the humiliation of shutting down and eating frost. So consider two examples that show the impact on victims and the futility of the policy.

On August 27, a black man of his decade stood in front of a chain-link fence near his house and spoke with his friend in a cellphone. He held the phone in one hand and the mouthpiece of a cord in the other hand. Two white plane officers approached him. An officer said he looked like he was smoking weed and pulling him against the fence. The man explained that he was talking on his phone, not consuming marijuana and that he was a drug consultant. Without asking permission, the officers slapped him and reached into his pocket. No sanctions were found.

On March 27, a boy, two white officers of the age of 6, were returning home to him who responded to 911 calls about unruly people. They pulled over with the boy, threw him down in the face of a police car, slapped him with handcuffs and wept. . Officers recovered only a cellphone and a few dollars. Yet they took him to the border and wrote a false report stating that he was guilty of a weapons offense. The reason for stopping was listed as “Fit Fitness” and “Furious Movement.”

During the Floyd trial, there are many more stops described by the victims in the painful details. But the point should be clear: Mayor Bloomberg, and many others born and raised in what is now known as white rights, do not put themselves in the shoes of these victims. As an elderly white woman, I will never be stopped and thrown in front of a wall. I know. And Mayor Bloomberg does too.

No one is appropriate. But there is one more aspect that Mr. Bloomberg probably does not know: his achievement in creating opportunities for a small minority of New Yorkers while he was mayor and his commitment to his good work in the post-mayor years.

At 28, he launched the Wacker initiative, which provides jobs to low-income people. The following year, he created a citywide anti-poverty program around a new Center for Economic Apartments, which received half of its $ 100 million primary funding from the city. The program also focuses on job creation. At 28, she led an agreement with the Building Trade Employers Association to ensure greater construction of women and minority-owned businesses and ensure that 5 percent of the education slots would be filled from the groups described below. Two years later, she launched the Corporate Alliance program, dedicated to increasing the value of public contracts in women and minority businesses, with the agreement increasing to 47 percent in these groups in 20 years. In 2006, only 379 businesses were certified to do business with the city. In the final year of Mr. Bloomberg’s office, the number has grown to 3,700. The Bloomberg administration established job-placement centers in several city housing authority buildings.

While these successes are seen in a combination of his post-mayor advocacy advocating for immigrant rights, environmental protection, abortion rights, and gun control, I am convinced that he has done much to atone for the inefficient use of stops and freezers. He should now be evaluated on the full record.

If he is the top man on the Democratic ticket this autumn, his failed stop and frisk policy should not prevent him from assuming the most important role. First of all, defeating the committed racist – who called for the execution of Central Park Five and who was in Charlottesville, Va.

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